One Night in Rabanel del Camino, Spain

At around 3:00 0 in the afternoon we finally arrived at our hotel in Rabanel del Camino, Spain.  Although most of the trail had seemed relatively flat, we were now in the mountains region and we started to experience long, steep inclines,  including the road through Rabanal del Camino to our hotel.

The isolated village of Rabanel del Camino is a small ancient hamlet with a population of about 60 residents, that sits at the foot of the Mount Irago and has a long interesting history.   During the time of the Crusades in the 14th century, the Knights of Templar were widely credited with defeating the Moors in the Iberian Peninsula.   That same secretive order protected Rabanel del Camino and provided protection to the Christian pilgrims crossing Mount Irago en route to Santiago.  Knowledge of the extensive history of Rabanel and the Pilgrimage forces me to understand just how many pilgrims have struggled to walk through its stone streets over prior centuries.

We choose to stay at the El Refugio Hosteria in the center of town, right on the Camino.  This quaint family-run inn has 16 rooms and is kept in immaculate condition.   The façade of the building is made of stone and the rooms overlook the Monastery, the Camino and you can view the mountains which we would pass through the following day in the distance.  We quickly went up to our 3rd-floor room and entered using an old-fashioned skeleton key.  I opened the unscreened windows to let in fresh air, while Elizabeth collapsed on her twin bed.    Inside the bathroom was the smallest tub I’ve ever seen, only about 2 feet by 2 feet, if my memory serves me right.  I filled it with cold tap water and both of us removed our hiking shoes and sweat soaked socks and soaked our feet for a good long time.  We immediately felt energized and comfortable.

I then walked across the street to the towns grocery/everything store to buy snacks and water for the next day.  I purchased some chocolate and a couple of liters of Aquarius which I wrongly assumed was regular water.  Back in the room I tasted the water and realized it wasn’t typical spring water but some sort of sports drink that neither of us liked, so we tossed it out.  Yuck.   Plan B was to purchase water for the next day from the hotel receptionist before we started out at 5:45am.  This turned out to be a big mistake because when we departed there was no one at reception and the stores/ café was closed, so we started walking the Camino without any water in a heatwave.  More on this in a future segment.

I then dragged Elizabeth to La Iglesia de Santa Maria de La Asuncion Church across from our hotel. Benedictine monks chant the vespers in Latin each night at this Romanesque church on the Camino.  The ancient building had a pretty bell tower but the inside appears to almost resemble a cave.  Because this service is well known to pilgrims as a must-see event it is usually packed with locals and pilgrims.  I am glad we experienced the vespers but we ended up standing in the back and Elizabeth pouted through the entire Latin mass.

The only caution I have is the chapel is tiny and unless you get there early and are lucky enough to get a set, you will be squeezed in the rear or sides with many other pilgrims and locals.  Here is the website if you would like additional information:

http://en.monteirago.org/

We ate a terrific Pilgrim’s meal at the restaurant in our Refugio. The entire gas light eatery was filled with pilgrims enjoying the ambiance, wine, and scrumptious meal.  I had the salad with tuna and some pork roast and Elizabeth had her usually spaghetti Bolognese and ice cream.  We then went upstairs to our room and past out from exhaustion.

Buen Camino

Click here to follow our journey

 

 

 

Short video of Monks chanting the vespers in Rabanel del Camino, Spain.

 

 

One Comment on “One Night in Rabanel del Camino, Spain

  1. Pingback: Mother and Daughter’s first day on the Camino Santiago – Delightful Mother and Daughter Travel Adventures

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