NYPD memorial stone placed on Cruz de Ferro

In the year 2009,  my family faced a heartbreaking situation when my husband and father to our 4-year-old daughter Elizabeth died after valiantly fighting the dreadful disease known as ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis).  At the time of his death, we both had successful careers and Elizabeth had not even begun kindergarten.  It rocked our world to the core, but I decided right away I was not going to allow our great misfortune ruin our lives, so I chose to survive.

After the funeral, I really had no time to properly grieve because I was responsible for a small child and a demanding career. We fell into a routine and with tremendous help from our family,  Elizabeth did great.  She is now 13 years old and remembers very little of our life before ALS robbed her of her dad.

I found working, commuting and single parenting very difficult, so at age 52, when I had accumulated enough time to retire, I did.  I stayed home and raised my then 7-year-old and removed some of the parental burdens from my parents, who up to my retirement were doing most of the child-rearing.

My late husband’s name was Joe and he was a New York City Police Detective.  Everyone who met him agreed he was the perfect example of a stereotypical NYPD type of guy, with his thick NYC accent, always impeccably dressed in Paul Stewart suits, quick-witted and sarcastic.   He was 6’5” and weighed well over 230 pounds so criminals rarely tried to flee or fight with him or his brothers in blue.  He definitely could protect himself and the rest of our family.  In 2008 he started slurring his words and losing weight but we did not know what was wrong.  In late 2008 it was apparent that the problem was ALS and several months later he was dead.

My husband was a September 11th World Trade Center first responder, as were most of the people we hung out with and knew, but his illness has yet to be formally linked to that horrible time.  As most of those who were present while the attack happened we know what really happened down there.  There were no respirators or face protection on that day and many, many people have since become sick and have passed on. Our family and friends believe his disease was caused by the toxins he inhaled during those first hours at Ground Zero.

I have wanted to walk the French Way of the Camino Santiago de Compostela since viewing the movie, “The Way” in 2010.  Although still struggling with grief, we had built a nice life for ourselves, but I thought if I completed this pilgrimage maybe I could finally put his death behind me.  The time was not right because of Elizabeth’s young age and I was fearful of taking her to Europe to walk alone.  In 2017 I finally decided the time was right, so Elizabeth and I flew to Spain to walk the Camino Santiago de Compostela.

One of the important stops along the Camino is named Cruz de Ferro (Iron Cross) and it is the highest point on the way.  As you can see from the attached photos,  a metal cross is affixed to tremendous wooden pole that is surrounded by a massive pile of small rocks which have been growing larger each year as pilgrims walk past.    Pilgrims place a rock in their backpack when they leave home and it stays there until they arrive at the Iron Cross and then they leave the rock at the base of the mound.  The act of leaving the stone is to absolve them from their sins and to leave their burdens or pain behind on the mound.

There are several legends of the origins of the Iron Cross, one being it was built by the hermit Gualcemo in the 11th Century to help pilgrims cross the mountains or maybe it was simply erected centuries earlier as a trail marker for when the ground was covered in snow.

While still at home we prepared a nice beach rock with Joe’s name and attached a small replica of his NYPD badge.  We carried it to Spain and hiked with it until we arrived in Cruz de Ferro.

When we approached Cruz de Ferro I was immediately struck at how different this site was from all the previous Camino stops.  There was a paved path,  lots of police vehicles watching the site and busloads of tourist waiting for their chance to climb to the top. Definitely not the quiet peaceful sites we used to on the Camino.

After Elizabeth and I climbed to the top of the mound I could only focus on the thought that what we were standing on had been built by so many others before us and all the new stones we were leaving would soon be crushed by future pilgrim’s stones thus building the pile larger.

Elizabeth and I then left our precious stone on the base with all the others.  This was a solemn moment for us and there were tears, but overall, I was overjoyed remembering our love and acknowledging the grief and great loss we have experienced during the past 8 years.  Rest in Peace Detective D.

We then continued on the way, happy to be in Spain, grateful to have been married to my best friend and hopeful that life for my daughter and I would just keep getting better.

 

Buen Camino

 

Click here to follow our journey

 

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Memorial Stone honoring my husband and Elizabeth’s dad

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Our memorial stone in the middle of so many others at Cruz de Ferro.

Elizabeth at the Iron Cross

Elizabeth standing on the Cruz de Ferro mound on the Camino Santiago de Compestela

Mother and Daughter at Cruz de Ferro

Mother and Daughter with memorial stone to leave at the Iron Cross

Elizabeth on the Camino Santiago de Compestela

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NYPD Detective and father at Ground Zero

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Elizabeth and her dad

7 Comments on “NYPD memorial stone placed on Cruz de Ferro

  1. Pingback: Montes des Leon, complete with fresh farmers cheese and cowbells. | Mother and Daughter's Delightful Travel Adventures

  2. I am so proud of the strength you have shown through your grief. You are an amazing Mom.

    Like

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