“Fifty Most Beautiful Miles in America”

If you are in Yellowstone National Park and want to travel to Mount Rushmore in South Dakota, I suggest an overnight stop in Cody, Wyoming. Buffalo Bill’s hometown has everything you could wish for in an authentic Western town including American Indians, cowboys, horses, and rodeos. Cody was my hands-down favorite stop outside the National Parks on a 14 day trip from Seattle to South Dakota.

 

https://www.travelwyoming.com/cities/cody

 

To drive from East Yellowstone to Cody take the Scenic Byway of Highway 20 through the Wapiti Valley. President Theodore Roosevelt called this stretch of highway the “fifty most beautiful miles in America” and I concur.

 

 

Shosone National Forest
East Yellowstone National Park to Cody, Wyoming

 

We drove this route a few years ago and the views and sights never end. At one point we saw about 50 wild horses running as a pack in a field about 20 feet from our vehicle. This drive is definitely a white knuckles type of journey because you are way up on a mountain pass and the drop down to the river is very deep. I would not do it again but am forever grateful that we experienced this special place.

Yellowstone National Park Visit
Moose Sighting in Wyoming

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Dignity Monument in South Dakota

As a mom and lover of all things National Parks,  I am happy to say that I took my child and parents to Mount Rushmore in Keystone, South Dakota.   I guess we will be heading back there soon because I want to see the Dignity statue as soon as possible.

South Dakota has 6 National Parks but is so vast it can take all day to drive across.  We only visited a few places in the Rapid City area which I will write about in future blogs.

 

 

The purpose of this current blog is two-fold:

 

 

1.  I just wanted to congratulate Dale Lamphere for designing and constructing the incredible statue named  Dignity in Chamberlain,  South Dakota.  The  50-foot stainless steel statue depicts a native American woman dressed in pioneer clothing and holding a quilt over her shoulders.  The quilt contains a star,  an important symbol to the Lakota and Dakota cultures which is equated with honor. This statue honors the Native Americans who hail from that area of South Dakota.   This beautiful statue symbolizes pride, strength, and durability of the native cultures.  It was dedicated to all the people of South Dakota in 2016.   I definitely want to visit Dignity someday.

http://lampherestudio.com/

 

Dignity
Dignity Statue in South Dakota

 

 

2. I started a National Park Planning and Logistics Group on Facebook and I would love if you could join in.  This small group is being formed so members can post suggestions on how to plan a trip to our majestic National Parks and how to save money while doing it.  The group is comprised of people who share a passion for travel to our parks and those who are in the planning stages and want to ask questions or voice concerns.

 

Here is the link and I hope you will join in if you are on Facebook:

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/125305504814515/?source_id=1721944117819416

 

National Parks Trip
Elizabeth and author trying on fake Stetsons

 

 

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The Crowds Descend on the Camino – Sarria -Portomarin

After a long, peaceful week on the Camino we felt part of the Camino family.  We knew what we were supposed to do and say to everyone, and most importantly what to expect each day. Get up, walk, eat and rest, nothing more, nothing less.

Once we arrived in Sarria, Spain the atmosphere quickly changed and the peaceful calm of the previous trail was gone.   There were pilgrims everywhere and they looked clean and energized with their sparkling new clothes and equipment.    Sarria, Spain is the starting points for most pilgrims walking the Camino because the final 100 kilometers it is the least distance you can walk and still qualify for a Compestela once you arrive in Santiago.   It was exciting to see so many new faces and groups but I was a little melancholy that the experience as I had known it, was over.

We stayed in a new albergue called Albergue Puente Ribeira in Sarria, right on the canal that runs through the Camino area.  We loved our albergue because it was near all the action including a street fair and many restaurants.  Puente Ribeira is super clean, modern and had several washers and dryers so we were able to sanitize our disgusting clothes and towels. Here is the website and I do absolutely recommend this place.

http://www.alberguepuenteribeira.com

Albergue in Sarria, Spain
Albergue in Sarria, Spain

 

My clothes were falling off me because I lost weight from the heat and longs hikes so we stop by the local Rhodani Sports Store and bought new trail pants and shirts. Yea!   The store was well stocked and the prices were similar to REI or Dicks in the US but they did not have a lot or any XL women clothes so I bought men’s clothes.   Here’s the website:

https://shop.rhodani.com/es/content/23-tienda-pesca-lugo

We enjoyed some seafood and rice at one of the many cafes along the canal and then retired to our much-loved room to prepare for the final 100 kilometers of our Camino.

The next morning, we departed our albergue and jumped right back on the Camino which was located behind our albergue.  All the additional pilgrims ensured the peacefulness and serenity of our prior days had disappeared, but it wasn’t unexpected.  We had been warned the most people start their Camino in Sarria and it was true.

 

We wandered through beautiful hills,  forest, and some older farming villages.  We peeked into some of the open barns to gaze at enormous cows and enjoyed listening to the roosters trying to wake everyone up.  Although the Camino had now changed for us it was still a simple place.

 

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Barns on the Camino
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Locals butchering an animal
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Donkey on the Camino
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The Crowds have arrived on the Camino

This day was long but it was relatively flat.  After lunch, I swore we had walked at least 30 miles but it was probably only about 15.  Today’s endeavor just would not end.   Just when I thought I couldn’t go on anymore we approached the River Mino and the Camino trail went over the bridge over the river.  Portomarin was our final destination for the day and it was just on the other side of the bridge.

Walking over the bridge was the most frightened I was our entire time in Spain. It was built high above the water and the cars sped by us pilgrims.    I thought for sure we were going to get hit and tossed straight down into the River Minho.    Looking back at the pictures it doesn’t look so precipitous as I remember but I guarantee you if you are the least bit afraid of heights you will not like anything about this bridge.  Funny, but my 12-year-old wasn’t concerned about the terrifying bridge in the least. She was singing along with her music and devoid of any fear.  Silly girl.

After timidly crossing the bridge we then faced a steep set of stairs up into Portomarin.

Will we ever finish this ‘easy’ day??  The stairs were a beast but the view the entire up is stunning, so we took our time and just kept climbing.  Unfortunately, after climbing the stairs and entering this charming town we discovered this town was built on a steep hill and the main church and our lodging were at the top of this hill.  Somehow we made arrived at our Refugio and were happy with our accomplishments.

 

River over Minho River on the Camino Santiago
Scary bridge on the Camino Santiago

 

 

 

Camino /Bridge into Portomarin.
View of the Bridge from Portomarin.

 

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Portomarin Spain Sign on Camino Santiago

 

Portomarin was definitely one of our favorite places. The main plaza has great restaurants where pilgrims congregate to socialize and discuss the day’s events.

Buen Camino

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New Facebook Group for Camino Prep

I just started a new Facebook Group for those wishing to begin researching, preparing and finding out info for a possible Camino Santiago de Compostela Pilgrimage.

This group is not made up of judgemental or experts on the Camino.  It is just a group of regular people who want to learn more about the Camino and possibly start planning their Pilgrimage.   Those who have walked before are especially welcomed to answer questions.

Please consider joining and contributing your knowledge.   Here is the link to copy and paste into your browser:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/2000846623526485/?ref=br_rs

 

Elizabeth on the Camino Santiago de Compestela

 

 

 

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Celebratory gathering outside the Cathedral in Leon, Spain

Just prior to beginning the Camino Santiago (French Route)  we observed this wonderful gathering of the local religious population outside the Cathedral de Leon on a beautiful Sunday morning.    The plaza is beautiful with lots to see and do.

Here is the official website if you want more info:  https://www.catedraldeleon.org

Sorry, my video skills are so poor.

Camino Santiago de Compostela with a soon-to-be teenager.

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Cathedral of Leon
Leon de Cathedral, Leon, Spain

 

 

 

Author in front of Cathedral
Cathedral in Leon, Spain