Our little room over a bar

The wonderful old town of Portomarin is a joy to visit for a pilgrim.  There are plenty of outdoor restaurants, discount and grocery stores and plenty of places to hang your laundry to dry.   The town’s square includes the Church of San Juan, a building that is both a church and a small castle.  This town is packed with road-weary pilgrims enjoying the fine outdoor cafes which surround the plaza.  If I could have stayed for an extra night just to relax and soak in the Camino vibe I would but it was time to move on.

 

Elizabeth standing next to Pilgrim Statue

Pilgrim Statue pointing towards Santiago in Portomarin, Spain.

 

Hotel in Casa do Maestro

This is a photo of the sun yard right directly in front of our room at the Casa do Mestro hotel in Portomarin, Spain. The building right outside of the wall is the St. Juan Church.

 

 

The next day was a blur. Pilgrims were everywhere on the trail, lots of small villages to walk through and unrelenting heat.   Busloads of pilgrims from all over Europe,  Asia, and South America were now on the way heading to Santiago.  At one point we were walking with two young men from Korea when one mentioned they were from North Korea.  What a wonderful experience for my daughter to realize that not everyone from North Korea hated Americans.  They were wearing expensive Patagonia clothing so I assume they weren’t typical citizens from DPRK.

Hundreds of Spanish school children are now on the Camino on school field trips.    They were singing songs, laughing and really seemed to be enjoying themselves.  I felt sorry for my child because she clearly did not fit in but this was to be expected because she was walking with her mom and they were with their classmates. But she did not seem to mind and she received lots of second looks from the teenage boys but she was too young to notice.

 

Pilgrim with flag from China

Pilgrims from all over the globe wear their flags draped on their backpacks. Here a Chinese Pilgrim with his flag.

 

We saw more than 1 family today pushing baby strollers up the steep hills and through the rocky paths.  These baby stroller-pushing families should be awarded a medal, I know I would never be able to do it.

 

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Families pushing baby strollers on the Camino

 

After about 7 hours of walking, we arrived at the town of  Palas de Rei.   After some searching, we realized our lodging was located directly over a noisy bar.   In fact, I had to enter the bar to obtain the keys to our room.  It wasn’t as bad as it sounds because the room was spotless with cute twin beds and extra soft blankets in the bureau but the windows opened into a nondescript courtyard.  I ensured the door was locked at all times and since there was no lobby I was not 100% comfortable staying there with my daughter.

This town was my least favorite place on the Camino, but it could have been because we were now just plain tired and worn out.  In my opinion, there was nothing exciting or interesting about this place and the highlight was watching the local children riding their skateboards in the towns’  square.  The Camino route in Palas dd Rei is on a steep paved hill and although the population is 3,500 it seemed more industrial than rural to me.

We ate supper with an atheist Pilgrim we briefly met the night before.  She was from the UK and she despised the United States, the United Kingdom, and all other wealthy nations.  Her goal in life seemed to be lecture everyone she met and ensure they were as miserable as she was.  At one point she told me her husband had left her and I have to admit I couldn’t blame him.     I quickly realized I did not want to spend one more minute with her, so I bought her a glass of wine and made up a story about needed to go make a call and we parted ways.

Back to the room above the bar.

 

All our belongings

All those items in the forefront fit in our back packs

 

 

Tomorrow is a new day.

 

Buen Camino

 

Click here to follow our journey

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