Credencial del Peregrino

Pilgrim’s Passport or Credential (credencial del peregrino) for the Camino Santiago de Compostela

While traveling on the Camino Santiago de Compostela pilgrims carry small accordion pleated booklet called a credential or pilgrim’s passport.  This document is used to identify you as a pilgrim and to track and verify your progress along the camino.  The credential has numerous small blank squares, that the pilgrims will eventually fill with inked stamps or ‘sellos’ from albergues, refugios, lodging, churches, police stations, museums, eating/drinking establishments, and tourist sites. Each place has its own unique sellos.

Although it is not required to have a credential to walk the camino, unless you are staying in an albergue ( pilgrim’s hostel), if you want to receive a compostela at the end of your journey, you must carry this document and have at least 2 sellos stamped in it every day from Sarria, Spain until you reach Santiago.  The official requirement request 2 sellos per day for the final 100km of walking ( or riding a horse) and 2 stamps per day for final 200km if you are on a bicycle.

Many of the stamps list the town on them and you can obtain one from the innkeeper when you check in at the end of the day and then an additional one from a church or restaurant during while you are walking.  You will see stamps and ink pads on most bars when you enter a place to buy a coffee. Just ask any waiter for a Camino sello and he will probably point to it and you will be free to stamp your passport.  Excluding albergues, if you do not ask for a stamp you probably won’t get one; it is on you to remember to get your stamps.

Most pilgrims start collecting stamps where ever they begin walking, not just in Sarria.  If you start in a far-reaching place like St. Jean Pied de Port, France you might need several credentials because they fill up.  Sellos are readily available at most places pilgrims frequent and they become a valuable memento of their Camino experience.

Once you arrive in Santiago proceed to the Pilgrim’s Welcome Office, receive your final stamp and at that point, they will examine your document and if you successfully meet the requirements you will be issued a Compostela which certifies your Camino.   You will be allowed to keep both your pilgrim’s passport and your Compostela.

Buen Camino.

Camino Santiago Prep
Preparation for 1st Camino.

 

 

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Graffiti: Art or Vandalism?

 

After leaving Palais del Rei it happened to be a Sunday and Sundays are different from the rest of the week on the Camino.  Many of the services we rely on are closed on Sunday in this part of the country.   So there won’t be two breakfasts for us today, no wonderful rest over café con leche and no socializing until we find an open cafe.    When we finally find something open we ordered double of everything because we weren’t sure if this would be our last refreshments until supper.

Spain is beautiful and gritty all at the same time.  The hills, farmlands and ancient forests are peaceful and spiritual but there is also inspirational pilgrim graffiti scrawled all over the place.   Some pilgrims seem to really enjoy reading and photographing the various tags and motivational sayings but I prefer not seeing it. Call me old-fashioned or closed minded but it’s not my thing.  My daughter loved reading all the messages so it might be a generational thing.

Many of the kilometer signposts are missing the actual plaque that lists the kilometers .to Santiago.    To me this is vandalism and the person who removed the small plaque, possibly for a souvenir,  is only hurting the local Camino Associations that have to raise money to replace it and all the pilgrims following the person who stole it.

Sundays also bring out multitudes of bike riders.   They are everywhere and are speeding by us slow walking pilgrims.   Some are just exercising on the hilly paths and some appear to be pilgrims because they are carrying a lot of gear.    They are racing up and down the dirt Camino roads and I was terrified we would be hurt. When the bicyclists are out in full force us pilgrims have to remain alert or risk colliding with the bikers.

I’ll try to be nicer tomorrow.  Buen Camino

 

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Pilgrims from Columbia, SA
Young Columbian Pilgrims on the Camino

 

Camino Santiago de Compostela
Camino trail being shared by walkers and cyclists on a Sunday.
Elizabeth leaving Palais del Rei
Walking out of Palais del Rei on a Sunday
Sunday on the Camino Santiago de Compostela
Sunday on the Camino

Our little room over a bar

The wonderful old town of Portomarin is a joy to visit for a pilgrim.  There are plenty of outdoor restaurants, discount and grocery stores and plenty of places to hang your laundry to dry.   The town’s square includes the Church of San Juan, a building that is both a church and a small castle.  This town is packed with road-weary pilgrims enjoying the fine outdoor cafes which surround the plaza.  If I could have stayed for an extra night just to relax and soak in the Camino vibe I would but it was time to move on.

 

Elizabeth standing next to Pilgrim Statue
Pilgrim Statue pointing towards Santiago in Portomarin, Spain.

 

Hotel in Casa do Maestro
This is a photo of the sun yard right directly in front of our room at the Casa do Mestro hotel in Portomarin, Spain. The building right outside of the wall is the St. Juan Church.

 

 

The next day was a blur. Pilgrims were everywhere on the trail, lots of small villages to walk through and unrelenting heat.   Busloads of pilgrims from all over Europe,  Asia, and South America were now on the way heading to Santiago.  At one point we were walking with two young men from Korea when one mentioned they were from North Korea.  What a wonderful experience for my daughter to realize that not everyone from North Korea hated Americans.  They were wearing expensive Patagonia clothing so I assume they weren’t typical citizens from DPRK.

Hundreds of Spanish school children are now on the Camino on school field trips.    They were singing songs, laughing and really seemed to be enjoying themselves.  I felt sorry for my child because she clearly did not fit in but this was to be expected because she was walking with her mom and they were with their classmates. But she did not seem to mind and she received lots of second looks from the teenage boys but she was too young to notice.

 

Pilgrim with flag from China
Pilgrims from all over the globe wear their flags draped on their backpacks. Here a Chinese Pilgrim with his flag.

 

We saw more than 1 family today pushing baby strollers up the steep hills and through the rocky paths.  These baby stroller-pushing families should be awarded a medal, I know I would never be able to do it.

 

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Families pushing baby strollers on the Camino

 

After about 7 hours of walking, we arrived at the town of  Palas de Rei.   After some searching, we realized our lodging was located directly over a noisy bar.   In fact, I had to enter the bar to obtain the keys to our room.  It wasn’t as bad as it sounds because the room was spotless with cute twin beds and extra soft blankets in the bureau but the windows opened into a nondescript courtyard.  I ensured the door was locked at all times and since there was no lobby I was not 100% comfortable staying there with my daughter.

This town was my least favorite place on the Camino, but it could have been because we were now just plain tired and worn out.  In my opinion, there was nothing exciting or interesting about this place and the highlight was watching the local children riding their skateboards in the towns’  square.  The Camino route in Palas dd Rei is on a steep paved hill and although the population is 3,500 it seemed more industrial than rural to me.

We ate supper with an atheist Pilgrim we briefly met the night before.  She was from the UK and she despised the United States, the United Kingdom, and all other wealthy nations.  Her goal in life seemed to be lecture everyone she met and ensure they were as miserable as she was.  At one point she told me her husband had left her and I have to admit I couldn’t blame him.     I quickly realized I did not want to spend one more minute with her, so I bought her a glass of wine and made up a story about needed to go make a call and we parted ways.

Back to the room above the bar.

 

All our belongings
All those items in the forefront fit in our back packs

 

 

Tomorrow is a new day.

 

Buen Camino

 

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The Crowds Descend on the Camino – Sarria -Portomarin

After a long, peaceful week on the Camino we felt part of the Camino family.  We knew what we were supposed to do and say to everyone, and most importantly what to expect each day. Get up, walk, eat and rest, nothing more, nothing less.

Once we arrived in Sarria, Spain the atmosphere quickly changed and the peaceful calm of the previous trail was gone.   There were pilgrims everywhere and they looked clean and energized with their sparkling new clothes and equipment.    Sarria, Spain is the starting points for most pilgrims walking the Camino because the final 100 kilometers it is the least distance you can walk and still qualify for a Compestela once you arrive in Santiago.   It was exciting to see so many new faces and groups but I was a little melancholy that the experience as I had known it, was over.

We stayed in a new albergue called Albergue Puente Ribeira in Sarria, right on the canal that runs through the Camino area.  We loved our albergue because it was near all the action including a street fair and many restaurants.  Puente Ribeira is super clean, modern and had several washers and dryers so we were able to sanitize our disgusting clothes and towels. Here is the website and I do absolutely recommend this place.

http://www.alberguepuenteribeira.com

Albergue in Sarria, Spain
Albergue in Sarria, Spain

 

My clothes were falling off me because I lost weight from the heat and longs hikes so we stop by the local Rhodani Sports Store and bought new trail pants and shirts. Yea!   The store was well stocked and the prices were similar to REI or Dicks in the US but they did not have a lot or any XL women clothes so I bought men’s clothes.   Here’s the website:

https://shop.rhodani.com/es/content/23-tienda-pesca-lugo

We enjoyed some seafood and rice at one of the many cafes along the canal and then retired to our much-loved room to prepare for the final 100 kilometers of our Camino.

The next morning, we departed our albergue and jumped right back on the Camino which was located behind our albergue.  All the additional pilgrims ensured the peacefulness and serenity of our prior days had disappeared, but it wasn’t unexpected.  We had been warned the most people start their Camino in Sarria and it was true.

 

We wandered through beautiful hills,  forest, and some older farming villages.  We peeked into some of the open barns to gaze at enormous cows and enjoyed listening to the roosters trying to wake everyone up.  Although the Camino had now changed for us it was still a simple place.

 

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Barns on the Camino
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Locals butchering an animal
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Donkey on the Camino
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The Crowds have arrived on the Camino

This day was long but it was relatively flat.  After lunch, I swore we had walked at least 30 miles but it was probably only about 15.  Today’s endeavor just would not end.   Just when I thought I couldn’t go on anymore we approached the River Mino and the Camino trail went over the bridge over the river.  Portomarin was our final destination for the day and it was just on the other side of the bridge.

Walking over the bridge was the most frightened I was our entire time in Spain. It was built high above the water and the cars sped by us pilgrims.    I thought for sure we were going to get hit and tossed straight down into the River Minho.    Looking back at the pictures it doesn’t look so precipitous as I remember but I guarantee you if you are the least bit afraid of heights you will not like anything about this bridge.  Funny, but my 12-year-old wasn’t concerned about the terrifying bridge in the least. She was singing along with her music and devoid of any fear.  Silly girl.

After timidly crossing the bridge we then faced a steep set of stairs up into Portomarin.

Will we ever finish this ‘easy’ day??  The stairs were a beast but the view the entire up is stunning, so we took our time and just kept climbing.  Unfortunately, after climbing the stairs and entering this charming town we discovered this town was built on a steep hill and the main church and our lodging were at the top of this hill.  Somehow we made arrived at our Refugio and were happy with our accomplishments.

 

River over Minho River on the Camino Santiago
Scary bridge on the Camino Santiago

 

 

 

Camino /Bridge into Portomarin.
View of the Bridge from Portomarin.

 

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Portomarin Spain Sign on Camino Santiago

 

Portomarin was definitely one of our favorite places. The main plaza has great restaurants where pilgrims congregate to socialize and discuss the day’s events.

Buen Camino

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New Facebook Group for Camino Prep

I just started a new Facebook Group for those wishing to begin researching, preparing and finding out info for a possible Camino Santiago de Compostela Pilgrimage.

This group is not made up of judgemental or experts on the Camino.  It is just a group of regular people who want to learn more about the Camino and possibly start planning their Pilgrimage.   Those who have walked before are especially welcomed to answer questions.

Please consider joining and contributing your knowledge.   Here is the link to copy and paste into your browser:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/2000846623526485/?ref=br_rs

 

Elizabeth on the Camino Santiago de Compestela

 

 

 

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Celebratory gathering outside the Cathedral in Leon, Spain

Just prior to beginning the Camino Santiago (French Route)  we observed this wonderful gathering of the local religious population outside the Cathedral de Leon on a beautiful Sunday morning.    The plaza is beautiful with lots to see and do.

Here is the official website if you want more info:  https://www.catedraldeleon.org

Sorry, my video skills are so poor.

Camino Santiago de Compostela with a soon-to-be teenager.

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Cathedral of Leon
Leon de Cathedral, Leon, Spain

 

 

 

Author in front of Cathedral
Cathedral in Leon, Spain

 

Horseback riding on the Camino Santiago

Today we went on a little horse ride up a  mountain trail on the Camino.

Elizabeth was still suffering from a blister on one of her toes,  and although we tried all the recommended therapies it was necessary to give her foot a rest so it could heal.  We decided to skip hiking for a day and to ride horses along the Camino trail instead.

Our next area to walk was up to the mountain hamlet known as  O’Cebreiro in Galicia and I found a horse stable called Al-Paso that caters to Pilgrims.  Al-Paso is located directly on the Camino in Herrerias and has twice daily trips up the mountain for about 30 euros each.  The manager’s name is Victor, and he was a wealth of information about the horses and the Camino.   Elizabeth was the youngest rider but luckily there was another young person about 18 years old for her to chum around with.  Our group consisted of about 8 riders,  2 guides and the rest Pilgrims from Italy, New Zealand and the USA.

The horses well-cared care for and were given a lot of attention and love by Victor and his staff.   There were a lot of flies swarming around the horses’ heads and they were not wearing fly masks,  but the assistant assured me that horses were used to it and it didn’t bother them.  Still,  I spent a lot of the time swatting the pesky insects off of my poor animal’s head during our ride.

Our group rode straight up the mountain and passed many Pilgrims and runners along the way. The ride was smooth but we moved at a quick enough pass that it was fun and exciting.  The farmlands and valley views were spectacular and we both really enjoyed this experience.

We only stopped once so the horses could have a drink from a water trough in the center of a small village about  3/4 of the way up.  Once we arrived at the top and dismounted we took some photos and then headed to the center of the ancient but tiny village  called O’Cebreiro,  where we  enjoyed local music, some tapas and liquid refreshments.

O’Cebreiro weather is startlingly different from the other parts of the Camino we had walked in.  It had a thick mist surrounding it and was much cooler and comfortable out.  There are lots of things  to see  in a small space which has been described as a hobbit’s hamlet. The round stone buildings with thatched roofs are called pallazas and they appear to be right out of a fairy tale.   I bought several tee shirts and the prices were very affordable.  This is a cool place to spend an afternoon.

Buen Camino

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Herrerias, Spain on the Camino Santiago de Compestela
Bridge above Herrerias, Spain
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Elizabeth about to ride to O’Ceb.
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We’re off
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Camino Santiago
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Camino Santiago
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Camino Santiago on Horseback
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Side of the trail
Horses at the top of O'Ceb on Camino Santiago
O’Ceb, Camino Santiago de Compestela
Mother and Daughter on top of the O'Ceb.
O’Cebreiro, Spain
The crew on top of O'Cebreiro, Spain
After completing our horseback ride we took a group photo with Victor.