Certificate of Distance – Camino Santiago de Compostela

Once my daughter and I completed our first Camino in 2017 (Astorga to Santiago) we responded to the Pilgrim’s Office (Oficina de Acogdia dl Peregrino) to obtain our Compostela.  We anxiously waited in line with Pilgrims from around the globe, and once it was our turn to step up to the long counter, we were greeted by a volunteer who asked us a few questions and examined our pilgrim’s passport.  He then advised we qualified for our first Compostela.  We were then offered an additional document ‘Certificate of  Distance’.  Although I had not previously heard about this document I ordered one without hesitation.

We were charged 3 euros and received our certificate. which was a beautiful document written in Spanish calligraphy and signed by the Dean of the Cathedral de Santiago.  This distance acknowledgment lists our names, starting point, dates of travel and the total Camino distance walked.   Some folks have said the kilometer distance is not accurate but this does not matter to me.  We also purchased a cardboard mailing tube to safeguard and/or ship our Compostela and ‘Certificate of Distance’ document for only 2 additional euros.

I believe the Pilgrim’s Office only began offering these “Certificate of Distance” documents in 2014 in conjunctions with the traditional Compostela for Pilgrims who reach Santiago de Compostela.  The Pilgrim’s office also allows you to request one via email if you were unable to obtain one after your Camino.

Here is a link to the Pilgrim’s Office in Santiago de Compostela:

https://oficinadelperegrino.com/oficina-peregrino

SailorsdelighttravelCertificateDistanceCamino
Certificate of  Distance -Mother and Daughter Travels

Buen Camino

SailorDelightTravelSantiagodeCompostala
Busy streets in Santiago de Compostela, Spain

Click here to follow our journey

Bravo to URCamino for developing a a super helpful planning tool

Camino Planning Tool- Recommendation

I found a neat Camino Website with a comprehensive planning feature for the following Caminos:

• Camino Francé
• Portugués
• Camino de Fisterra
• Via Francigena
• Primitivo
• Portugués Interior
• Camino de Muxia

Go to the website ( see below for link)  and read about the various routes. Enter your data into the simple to use planner and once you figure out which route you want, enter your starting point, such as St Jean Pied de Port, then add your last stop, such as Santiago de Compostela.

This awesome tool then allows the user to check off all sorts of interesting options based on your budget and desires. You can pick the type of lodging you want and various travel amenities, such a municipal lodging or private, WIFI and washing machines. It has a comprehensive list of options.
Another great feature is once everything is plugged in you are able to download for future use.

Thank you to CRCamino for developing a super helpful webpage.

Here is their link:

http://www.urcamino.com/

Buen Camino.

 

captura-de-pantalla-2018-11-28-18-20-21.png
Excellent Camino Planning Website for Numerous Routes

Click here to follow our story

Camino Day 1

A blogger friend started his second Camino this week. Here is his blog. We are starting our second next week.

Chris Osborne Adventures

Day 1 St Jean Pied de Port to Roncesvalles

I work up early as I was super excited to start my Camino, only thing was I told Ashley and Nora that I was going to meet them at 8am. There was a chill in the air at 7:15am and the wind was blowing down the cobble lined streets. I waited another 15mins and had to send Ashley a message saying I was going to start and meet up with them later.

I walked about 50m got cashed up and some supplies from one of the only shops open at this hr. Continue out of town it was a steep accent and from previous experience I knew it wasn’t going to let up for the next few hrs.

The weather was sunny but it took a good 30 minuets hiking before I was warm enough to take my jumper off.

The…

View original post 959 more words

Graffiti: Art or Vandalism?

 

After leaving Palais del Rei it happened to be a Sunday and Sundays are different from the rest of the week on the Camino.  Many of the services we rely on are closed on Sunday in this part of the country.   So there won’t be two breakfasts for us today, no wonderful rest over café con leche and no socializing until we find an open cafe.    When we finally find something open we ordered double of everything because we weren’t sure if this would be our last refreshments until supper.

Spain is beautiful and gritty all at the same time.  The hills, farmlands and ancient forests are peaceful and spiritual but there is also inspirational pilgrim graffiti scrawled all over the place.   Some pilgrims seem to really enjoy reading and photographing the various tags and motivational sayings but I prefer not seeing it. Call me old-fashioned or closed minded but it’s not my thing.  My daughter loved reading all the messages so it might be a generational thing.

Many of the kilometer signposts are missing the actual plaque that lists the kilometers .to Santiago.    To me this is vandalism and the person who removed the small plaque, possibly for a souvenir,  is only hurting the local Camino Associations that have to raise money to replace it and all the pilgrims following the person who stole it.

Sundays also bring out multitudes of bike riders.   They are everywhere and are speeding by us slow walking pilgrims.   Some are just exercising on the hilly paths and some appear to be pilgrims because they are carrying a lot of gear.    They are racing up and down the dirt Camino roads and I was terrified we would be hurt. When the bicyclists are out in full force us pilgrims have to remain alert or risk colliding with the bikers.

I’ll try to be nicer tomorrow.  Buen Camino

 

Click here to follow our journey

 

Pilgrims from Columbia, SA
Young Columbian Pilgrims on the Camino

 

Camino Santiago de Compostela
Camino trail being shared by walkers and cyclists on a Sunday.

Elizabeth leaving Palais del Rei
Walking out of Palais del Rei on a Sunday

Sunday on the Camino Santiago de Compostela
Sunday on the Camino

Our little room over a bar

The wonderful old town of Portomarin is a joy to visit for a pilgrim.  There are plenty of outdoor restaurants, discount and grocery stores and plenty of places to hang your laundry to dry.   The town’s square includes the Church of San Juan, a building that is both a church and a small castle.  This town is packed with road-weary pilgrims enjoying the fine outdoor cafes which surround the plaza.  If I could have stayed for an extra night just to relax and soak in the Camino vibe I would but it was time to move on.

 

Elizabeth standing next to Pilgrim Statue
Pilgrim Statue pointing towards Santiago in Portomarin, Spain.

 

Hotel in Casa do Maestro
This is a photo of the sun yard right directly in front of our room at the Casa do Mestro hotel in Portomarin, Spain. The building right outside of the wall is the St. Juan Church.

 

 

The next day was a blur. Pilgrims were everywhere on the trail, lots of small villages to walk through and unrelenting heat.   Busloads of pilgrims from all over Europe,  Asia, and South America were now on the way heading to Santiago.  At one point we were walking with two young men from Korea when one mentioned they were from North Korea.  What a wonderful experience for my daughter to realize that not everyone from North Korea hated Americans.  They were wearing expensive Patagonia clothing so I assume they weren’t typical citizens from DPRK.

Hundreds of Spanish school children are now on the Camino on school field trips.    They were singing songs, laughing and really seemed to be enjoying themselves.  I felt sorry for my child because she clearly did not fit in but this was to be expected because she was walking with her mom and they were with their classmates. But she did not seem to mind and she received lots of second looks from the teenage boys but she was too young to notice.

 

Pilgrim with flag from China
Pilgrims from all over the globe wear their flags draped on their backpacks. Here a Chinese Pilgrim with his flag.

 

We saw more than 1 family today pushing baby strollers up the steep hills and through the rocky paths.  These baby stroller-pushing families should be awarded a medal, I know I would never be able to do it.

 

0624170856.jpg
Families pushing baby strollers on the Camino

 

After about 7 hours of walking, we arrived at the town of  Palas de Rei.   After some searching, we realized our lodging was located directly over a noisy bar.   In fact, I had to enter the bar to obtain the keys to our room.  It wasn’t as bad as it sounds because the room was spotless with cute twin beds and extra soft blankets in the bureau but the windows opened into a nondescript courtyard.  I ensured the door was locked at all times and since there was no lobby I was not 100% comfortable staying there with my daughter.

This town was my least favorite place on the Camino, but it could have been because we were now just plain tired and worn out.  In my opinion, there was nothing exciting or interesting about this place and the highlight was watching the local children riding their skateboards in the towns’  square.  The Camino route in Palas dd Rei is on a steep paved hill and although the population is 3,500 it seemed more industrial than rural to me.

We ate supper with an atheist Pilgrim we briefly met the night before.  She was from the UK and she despised the United States, the United Kingdom, and all other wealthy nations.  Her goal in life seemed to be lecture everyone she met and ensure they were as miserable as she was.  At one point she told me her husband had left her and I have to admit I couldn’t blame him.     I quickly realized I did not want to spend one more minute with her, so I bought her a glass of wine and made up a story about needed to go make a call and we parted ways.

Back to the room above the bar.

 

All our belongings
All those items in the forefront fit in our back packs

 

 

Tomorrow is a new day.

 

Buen Camino

 

Click here to follow our journey

“Fifty Most Beautiful Miles in America”

If you are in Yellowstone National Park and want to travel to Mount Rushmore in South Dakota, I suggest an overnight stop in Cody, Wyoming. Buffalo Bill’s hometown has everything you could wish for in an authentic Western town including American Indians, cowboys, horses, and rodeos. Cody was my hands-down favorite stop outside the National Parks on a 14 day trip from Seattle to South Dakota.

 

https://www.travelwyoming.com/cities/cody

 

To drive from East Yellowstone to Cody take the Scenic Byway of Highway 20 through the Wapiti Valley. President Theodore Roosevelt called this stretch of highway the “fifty most beautiful miles in America” and I concur.

 

 

Shosone National Forest
East Yellowstone National Park to Cody, Wyoming

 

We drove this route a few years ago and the views and sights never end. At one point we saw about 50 wild horses running as a pack in a field about 20 feet from our vehicle. This drive is definitely a white knuckles type of journey because you are way up on a mountain pass and the drop down to the river is very deep. I would not do it again but am forever grateful that we experienced this special place.

Yellowstone National Park Visit
Moose Sighting in Wyoming

Click here to follow our journey